Math 102 - College Algebra ... Course Syllabus

 

Math 102 - College Algebra (3 credits)

Dakota State University, Fall Semester 2010

  • Section 04: MWF 01:00 - 01:50 pm, Science Center 114

Professor

Dr. Jeffrey S. Palmer

Office: Science Center 146 I

Phone: 256-5190

Email: jeff.palmer@.dsu.edu

Office Hours: MTWF 09:00-10:50 am and MW 02:00-02:50 pm

Homepage: http://www.homepages.dsu.edu/palmerj/

 

Prerequisite

Math 101 (with a grade of C or better) or appropriate math placement.

 

Catalog Description

Equations and inequalities; polynomial functions and graphs; exponents, radicals, binomial theorem, zeros of polynomials; systems of equations; exponential, logarithmic, and inverse functions, applications and graphs. Other topics selected from sequences, series, and complex numbers. (2010-2011 DSU Undergraduate Catalog)

 

Required Text

College Algebra, Third Edition by Beecher, Penna, and Bittinger (Pearson / Addison Wesley). This text and MyMathLab can be accessed using an access code that is available for sale at www.coursecompass.com or from the DSU Bookstore. The access code is required, while the textbook is optional. Once you have purchased the access code, you may sign up for this College Algebra course using the Course ID # palmer16734.

 

          MyMathLab Online Support: http://247pearsoned.custhelp.com/ (click on the Ask a Question Tab)
          MyMathLab Phone Support:  1-800-677-6337

 

Use of Tablets in the Classroom
The Tablet PC platform has been adopted across the DSU campus for all students and faculty, and tablet usage has been integrated into all DSU classes to enhance the learning environment. Tablet usage for course-related activities, note taking, and research is allowed and encouraged by DSU instructors.  However, inappropriate and distracting use will not be tolerated in the classroom.  Instructors set policy for individual classes and are responsible for informing students of class-specific expectations relative to Tablet PC usage. Failure to follow the instructor’s guidelines will hinder academic performance and may lead to disciplinary actions. Continued abuse may lead to increased tablet restrictions for the entire class. Because tablet technology is an integral part of this course, it is the student’s responsibility to ensure that his/her Tablet PC is operational prior to the beginning of each class period.

  

Introduction and Methodology

This course will probably be very different from any mathematics course you have previously taken. Typically, mathematics is taught by the “plug-and-chug" method; students are given a number of examples of certain problem types and asked to practice these manipulations on a long list of related problems. The hope is that through repetitive manipulation, skill and understanding of important concepts will be attained. Too often, however, it seems that this is not the case.

 

I hope you will develop knowledge of, skill in, and understanding of those fundamental calculations that are needed in your mathematical toolbox. Mathematics is not moving symbols around on a piece of paper and obtaining the correct answer. You should always be asking yourself what you are doing and why you are doing it. We will use our mathematical toolbox to examine applied problems from a variety of disciplines. Applications from biology, chemistry, physics, business, economics, and other areas form an integral part of the course. Mathematics is not a cookbook discipline; the ultimate validation of your skills and understanding is reflected in your ability to develop solutions to problems that are new and unfamiliar to you. You will encounter, in course assignments and evaluations, activities that require problem solving and critical thinking. Finally, I hope that you will come to understand and appreciate both the power and the shortcomings of technology, particularly the computer, as a tool for understanding mathematical concepts and for solving applied problems. In conclusion, as a student in this course you are expected to

  • learn, practice, and master basic skills

  • understand important concepts

  • apply your knowledge to other disciplines

  • engage in problem solving and critical thinking

  • use technology as an appropriate tool

Class time will be devoted to the presentation, principally lecture/discussion and computer demonstration of new material. When appropriate the computer (in particular the computer algebra system Maple and Excel spreadsheets) will be used as a tool to help us explore and better understand the mathematics we are studying. The core of the course will roughly cover material contained in chapters 1-5 of your textbook. Certain sections and parts of sections will be skipped and some additional material from outside sources may be introduced.

 

Lecture time is at a premium, so it must be used efficiently. You cannot be "taught" everything in the classroom. It is your responsibility to learn the material. Most of this learning must take place outside the classroom. In order to succeed, you must do your homework assignments on a daily basis. I expect that, for an average student, each will take approximately two or three hours of solid time to complete. It is critical that you not only solve the problems but that you also understand what you did and why. Expect this course to be both extremely challenging and yet fair. I subscribe to the philosophy that if challenged, students will respond to meet that challenge.

 

System General Education Goals

This course satisfies Regental General Education Goal  5: Students will understand and apply fundamental mathematical processes and reasoning.

  • Student Learning Outcome 1: Use mathematical symbols and mathematical structure to model and solve real world problems.

  • Student Learning Outcome 2: Demonstrate appropriate communication skills related to mathematical terms and concepts.

  • Student Learning Outcome 3: Demonstrate the correct use of quantifiable measurements of real world situations.

These outcomes shall be addressed through our study of the theory and application of linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions and their use as mathematical models. Assessment will be through assigned homework, quizzes, worksheets, and examinations.

 

Evaluation Procedure

Homework quizzes will be assigned on a regular basis, usually at the completion of our classroom discussion of each of the course lessons. Your percentage score on all such assignments will be used to calculate your homework quiz grade (out of 60 points) for the course. Additionally, there are four 60-point examinations scheduled during the semester. Each exam will be cumulative, covering material from the beginning of the course through the preceding Friday, however, the emphasis will be on new material.
 

Exam 1 Wednesday 29 Sep In Class  
Exam 2 Wednesday 27 Oct In Class  
Exam 3 Wednesday 24 Nov In Class  
Exam 4 Monday 13 Dec 01:00 - 03:00 pm  

 

Your grade will be calculated using your accumulated point total (four 60-point examinations and 60 points for assigned homework). The grading scale is

 

A B C D F
255 - 300 210 - 254 180 - 209 150 - 179 000 - 149

 

Students near a cutoff may receive the higher grade at the discretion of the instructor.

 

Attendance

While there is no policy of required attendance of lectures in this course, it is unlikely that you will be able to earn a good grade without regularly attending the lectures. When you miss class, whatever the reason, you really miss important material from three lectures not one. Obviously the lesson covered that particular day is missed but you also miss out on important connections of that days material with the previous days lesson and the following days lesson. Also, if you are on academic probation or are an at-risk student, you are required to attend every class meeting. You are expected to arrive at lecture on time and to remain for the entire class period. If for some reason you must arrive late or leave early please do so quietly. Talking or other behavior that disrupts lecture will not be tolerated. If for any reason I am late for the start of class and you have not received official notification that the class has been canceled, you are expected to remain for 15 minutes before “assuming" that the lecture has been canceled for the day. Above all else, show respect for your classmates. Your attendance, behavior, and participation in the class have effects on others beside yourself.

 

Academic Honesty

Cheating and other forms of academic dishonesty run contrary to the purpose of higher education and will not be tolerated in this course. Academic dishonesty includes giving, receiving, or using unauthorized aid on any academic work. All academic work done contains an implicit pledge by you that no unauthorized aid has been received. A student guilty of first-offense academic dishonesty will receive a grade of zero for the work attempted. A student guilty of the second offense will receive a grade of “F" for the course. DSU’s policy on academic integrity (DSU Policy 04-05-00) is available online at http://www.departments.dsu.edu/hr/newsite/policies/032200.htm

 

Freedom in Learning Statement
Students are responsible for learning the content of any course of study in which they are enrolled. Under Board of Regents and University policy, student academic performance shall be evaluated solely on an academic basis and students should be free to take reasoned exception to the data or views offered in any course of study.  It has always been the policy of Dakota State University to allow students to appeal the decisions of faculty, administrative, and staff members and the decisions of institutional committees.  Students who believe that an academic evaluation is unrelated to academic standards but is related instead to judgment of their personal opinion or conduct should contact the dean of the college which offers the class to initiate a review of the evaluation.

ADA Statement
If you have a documented disability and/or anticipate needing accommodations (e.g., non-standard note taking, extended time on exams or a quiet space for taking exams) in this course, please contact the instructor. Also, please contact Dakota State University’s ADA coordinator, Keith Bundy (located in the Student Development Office in the Trojan Center Underground or via email at
Keith.Bundy@dsu.edu or via phone (605-256-5121) as soon as possible. The DSU website containing additional information, along with the form to request accommodations, is available at http://www.dsu.edu/student-life/disability-services/index.aspx.  You will need to provide documentation of your disability. The ADA coordinator must confirm the need for accommodations before officially authorizing them.  

Student Concerns

There is an established policy for resolving concerns regarding grades and other academic matters. This policy may be found in the university catalog. If you should have a complaint or concern about grades or any other aspect of this course you are responsible for following this established procedure.

 

The instructor reserves the right to make adjustments in this course!

 

Academic Orientation

You are no longer in high school. The great majority of you, not having done so already, will have to discard high school notions of teaching and learning and replace them by university-level notions. This may be difficult, but it must happen sooner or later, so sooner is better. Our goal is more than just getting you to reproduce what was told to you in the classroom.

 

Expect to have material covered at two to three times the pace of high school. Above that, we aim for greater command of the material, especially the ability to apply what you have learned to new situations (when relevant).

 

The instructors’ job is primarily to provide a framework, with some of the particulars, to guide you in doing your learning of the concepts and methods that comprise the material of the course. It is not to "program" you with isolated facts and problem types, nor to monitor your progress.

 

Lecture time is at a premium, so it must be used efficiently. You cannot be "taught" everything in the classroom. It is your responsibility to learn the material. Most of this learning must take place outside the classroom. You should expect to put in two or three hours outside the classroom for each hour of class.

 

Approximate Schedule and Course Outline

 

01 Sep

W

Introduction and Overview  

02 Sep

R

   

03 Sep

F

Lesson 01 - An Introduction to the Function Concept  
       

06 Sep

M

No Class - Labor Day  

07 Sep

T

   

08 Sep

W

Lesson 01 / Lesson 02  

09 Sep

R

Last Day to Add/Drop a Full Semester Class  

10 Sep

F

Lesson 02 - Rectangular Coordinates  
       

13 Sep

M

Lesson 03 - Graphs and Equations Revisited  

14 Sep

T

   

15 Sep

W

Lesson 03 / Lesson 04  

16 Sep

R

   

17 Sep

F

Lesson 04 - Equations of Lines  
       

20 Sep

M

Lesson 05 - Linear Functions  

21 Sep

T

   

22 Sep

W

Lesson 05 / Lesson 06  

23 Sep

R

   

24 Sep

F

Lesson 06 - Systems of Two Linear Equations  
       

27 Sep

M

Lesson 07 - Systems of Three Linear Equations  

28 Sep

T

   

29 Sep

W

EXAM 01  

30 Sep

R

   

01 Oct

F

Lesson 07 / Lesson 08  
       

04 Oct

M

Lesson 08 - Matrix Operations  

05 Oct

T

   

06 Oct

W

Lesson 09 - Quadratic Equations  

07 Oct

R

   

08 Oct

F

Lesson 09 / Lesson 10  
       

11 Oct

M

No Class - Native American Day  

12 Oct

T

   

13 Oct

W

Lesson 10 - Quadratic Functions  

14 Oct

R

   

15 Oct

F

Lesson 11 - Applied Functions  
       

18 Oct

M

Lesson 11 / Lesson 12  

19 Oct

T

   

20 Oct

W

Lesson 12 - Maximum and Minimum Problems  

21 Oct

R

   

22 Oct

F

Lesson 13 - Polynomial Functions  
       

25 Oct

M

Lesson 13 / Lesson 14  

26 Oct

T

   

27 Oct

W

EXAM 02
Mid-term Deficient Grades Due
 

28 Oct

R

   

29 Oct

F

Lesson 14 - Rational Functions  
       

01 Nov

M

Lesson 15 - Exponential Functions  

02 Nov

T

   

03 Nov

W

Lesson 15 / Lesson 16  

04 Nov

R

   

05 Nov

F

Lesson 16 - Inverse Functions  
       

08 Nov

M

Lesson 17 - Logarithmic Functions  

09 Nov

T

   

10 Nov

W

Lesson 17 / Lesson 18  

11 Nov

R

No Class - Veterans Day  

12 Nov

F

Lesson 18 - Properties of Logarithms  
       

15 Nov

M

Lesson 19 - Logarithmic and Exponential Equations
Last Day to Withdraw
 

16 Nov

T

   

17 Nov

W

Lesson 19 / Lesson 20  

18 Nov

R

   

19 Nov

F

Lesson 20 - Compound Interest  
       

22 Nov

M

Lesson 21 - Exponential Growth and Decay  

23 Nov

T

   

24 Nov

W

EXAM 03  

25 Nov

R

No Class - Thanksgiving Holiday  

26 Nov

F

No Class - Thanksgiving Holiday  
       

29 Nov

M

Lesson 21 / Lesson 22  

30 Nov

T

   

01 Dec

W

Lesson 22 - Composition of Functions  

02 Dec

R

   

03 Dec

F

Lesson 23 - Iteration  
       

06 Dec

M

Lesson 23 / Lesson 24  

07 Dec

T

   

08 Dec

W

Lesson 24 - Iterated Models  

09 Dec

R

   

10 Dec

F

Wrap Up and Conclusion  
       

13 Dec

M

EXAM 04